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20130421
20130421
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pot, how do you rise boff your station. for me it was the profession of law. i didn't know what a lawyer's life would be. >> imus: so you got a scholarship to nyu. >> yes. >> imus: academic? >> yes. >> no, don, it was football. >> imus: and then a scholarship to harvard law? >> i got a scholarship to harvard law. because of though scholarships, now that's what i do with my primary giving back is really i've endowed a school in my name at nyu for those that want to study music and make it a profession. >> imus: when you graduated from harvard law, what did you do want to do? >> i was ready to go be a lawyer. i chose a small law firm because i was somewhat tired of the competition. you know, the new york city and the school system is intense. but i found that the small law firm with the biggest client gets merged or bought, you're vulnerable. to i applied to a law firm that represented columbia records and cbs. this was my first lucky break. >> imus: w, at this point in life what role did music play? >> i was just a regular music listener. i didn't collect records. when i look aro
. neither was infanticide. in fact, the roman law mandated it of especially deformed infants. infants would be left out, taken up into slavery or just die. so you see the moral transformation of the west in accordance with christianity. whether you're christian or not, you can say, yeah, i see this happening. certain things now are held to be bad that before, people that were indifferent about or thought was good. and then beginning -- well, actually, i argue beginning in the early 1500s but certainly by the 1900s and the 20th century, the sort of arc of christianity starts to descend s and as we have increasing secularization of the west, that coip sides with the rise of liberalism because they really are, in many ways if not all ways, the same thing. and you see the same moral issues, you see a clash between the christian moral world view and liberalism. and liberalism generally takes the side of the kind of things that were affirmed in the roman empire. so just as an historian of ethics, i can see that. not even have to take sides, you still see the same ethical transformation historical
community and the attacks are impossible for the federal law enforcement community to stop. so how to make ourselves more resilient? the steps we need to take are not that sexy. we need to upgrade our transit systems and infrastructure so as to make them less vulnerable to attacks. for example, flynn notes the u.s. navy has invested more in protecting the single port of san diego that is home to the pacific fleet than the department of homeland security has invest ed in the ports of ls angeles, long beach, san francisco, oakland, seattle, and tacoma combined, upon which a bulk of the u.s. economy relies. we must strengthen recovery in the event of a biological attack, which is still the most worrying threat out there. we need to make sure that the public understands the nature of these threats and how it can help identify and respond to them. above all, it needs to understand how not to respond to them. when bad things happen, it's easy to react out of fear, emotion and anger. let's hope that in boston this week we begin to chart a different course. for more on this, you can read my column
happened including american support for -- as a law enforcement and intelligence practitioner is inclusiveness in america. as a law enforcement tool, i worried all along when i was in the business that americans would start to say as a result of events like this that there are real americans and other americans. that kind of mentality if we ever get it will accelerate i think these cases of radicalization. kids like this when they take the oath will say i took the oath but i'm still not accepted. >> to what exstent one of the dangers here? one can overread too much. these may be two cases of a bad situation. to what extent might be assimilation machine in the u.s. be broken down or not functioning as well as it used to. in europe, minority communities were excluded marginalized but not in the united states. the polling data suggests that. but does this tell us maybe we should pay attention to that? >> compared to what? the assimilation mod until the united states works marvelously compared to france or germany or great britain. if you look back in history, the irish, the jews,
dead after a dramatic shootout with law enforcement early friday morning. his 19-year-old dzhokhar escaped on foot precipitating a shelter in place order for the entire boston area. but the much sought after armed and dangerous teen was found wounded and incoherent in a boat parked in the backyard of a suburban watertown home. discovered not by the hundreds of armed officers who had been searching for him for hours but by the home's owner, reportedly out for a smoke. with one assailant dead and the other in police custody, the people of watertown and the entire boston area expressed their enormous gratitude and sense of relief with spontaneous cheers and applause on friday night. the crisis is over. now the politics begin and this is where our responsibility in the media shifts. in the heat of the crisis, media take on the job of informational clearinghouse, keeping the public up to date, sharing critical information and get the information out right and fast. granted, those are goals that can contradict at times. now we must step back from the incessant drumbeat of breaking news t
and sedated. >> all the law enforcement professionals are hoping for a host of reasons that the suspect survives because we have many questions. those questions need to be answered. >> in this photograph taken right after his arrest, the college student's neck area appears covered with blood. the younger brother'ses cape was busted when a man found him hiding in his backyard boat. thermal images shows a white image of an object projecting heat. in another still photo you can make out the suspect's feet in black lying in the boat. a robotic arm moves in and lifts the tarp. . the police chief tells wolf blitzer about those moments. >> we began negotiations that way. over a long period of time, we were able to finally get him to surrender. >> agents yell at him to give himself up. police say there was an exchange of gunfire. authorities said his injuries came during thursday night's shootout when his brother was killed. agents spent the day combing over every inch of the boat collecting blood, hair and more to build a case against the suspected boston marathon bomber. and today prosecutors
have demanded that the law should be made stricter. and the people who rape children and also use brutality and barbarity in their acts should be hanged. >> protesters also held a vigil at the hospital where the five- year-old victim is being treated. doctors say she is in stable condition and with her family. the death toll after this weekend's earthquake in china has risen to over 200. the quake struck on saturday morning in the southwest of the country, leaving more than 11,000 injured. rescuers in sichuan province are still searching for survivors after the 6.6 magnitude quake largely leveled entire villages. hundreds of aftershocks have been registered. some areas have been cut off from power and water services. flewse premier li keqiang to the disaster zone to oversee government response to the quake. figure in german soccer is being probed for alleged tax evasion. media reports say that he paid 6 million euros in back taxes. germanhe most prominent figure in recent years to face tax investigation over tax avoidance. >> the investigation into his tax affairs is a hot topic a
by will you -- must include the contributions of the transgendered? by law. you will have to have pages on transgendered contributions. people who were crossed over sex, or dressed in the other sex. clothing. isn't that absurd? isn't that totalitarian? i thought the purpose of the textbook was to tell the truth, not make groups feel good. but as i point out in the book, leftism is overwhelmingly rooted in feelings. >> host: dennis prager is the author. "still the best hope" is the name of his recent best seller. louis from florida, you're on the air. you're talking with dennis prager. >> caller: i'd like to ask mr. prayinger and his ilk what he just said about truth, why should people believe the bible when that's the biggest novel ever written? who believes the earth is 5,000 years old? how can you follow a book that tells you the world is 5,000 years old and hisclass commentary about the christian schools and the seminary, how does he say something like that and he wants to be honest? i know this man is a right winger, and he wouldn't fifth credit to anybody, but my main question is,
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8